Twelve Trends Will Shape The Year in Retail

Ahead: Smaller Stores, Personalization, Experience, and Tech Everywhere
Last month – January – is always “Predictions Month,” with pundits in every industry scanning the horizon for what’s ahead. We’ve reviewed most of the 2017 retail and retail real estate outlooks and wanted to share what we think is the best of the bunch. The comprehensive list that follows is from the Vend blog and includes observations from experts worldwide. Keep an eye on these twelve as the year rolls forward.

Shoppers Will Seek Retailers Who Deliver a Good In-Store Experience
1. Stores offering unique shopping experiences will thrive. “Experience” includes special additions like food services, but also the delivery of a seamless shopping experience, reflecting the online world. Crate + Barrel’s “Mobile Tote” is a good example. Shoppers use store-provided tablets to browse and note their favorites, while sales associates ready their orders.

2. Smaller stores will win out over their super-sized counterparts. Time-starved shoppers have less tolerance for navigating big spaces and look for easy-to-access inventory. Target, Best Buy and Ikea have jumped in with junior box stores. Expect more to follow.

3. Specialty stores will perform better than department stores. Building on #2 above, smaller venues with well-curated inventory and a knowledgable staff will beat the traditional department store concept. Note: those Millennials everyone is chasing are specialty store fans.

4. “Retailment” (the fusion of retail and entertainment) is the new game in town. To entice shoppers to leave their screens for an out-of-home experience, retailers will deliver everything from virtual reality to pop-ups. Note the rise of theaters that serve dinner and cocktails along with the movie.

 

Services Will Be Expected

5. Shoppers will expect same-day shipping. Consumers want the traditional gratification of having their purchase on the day they make it.

6. Personalization will be more important than ever. Shoppers want to be recognized and rewarded. Loyalty programs will step up their game with more customized offers based on buying history and other data.

 

The Reign of Tech Will Continue
7. Mobile will be the way to pay. TechCrunch predicts that there will be 447.9 million mobile payment users this year. Purchases in this mode will total $60 billion in 2017 and $503 billion in 2020. Savvy retailers will adopt whatever system fits them best, choosing from custom apps or third-party options like Apple Pay.

8. Omnichannel growth will continue. Effective omnichannel strategies will separate the winners from the losers in 2017. Vend’s retail trend watchers expect to see retailers push omnichannel in bold, new directions to deliver that seamless experience.

9. Data will continue to drive retail success. Data will be a force in every aspect of the retail process from supply chain to purchase. Collection and analysis of information will be a top focus, with social shopping making a major contribution.

10. Retail and tech will unite to deliver new ways to bring shoppers into bricks and mortar stores. Science fiction will come to shopping: the Internet of Things, virtual reality, artificial intelligence and robots.

11. Apps, services and third parties will help bricks and mortars compete with online. But there’s one caveat: retailers will need to be selective about the tech products and platforms that serve their particular needs. There will be many to choose from. The best options are the ones that free the user to focus on the customer.

 

Transparency and Sustainability: Must Haves for Success in 2017
12. It’s no longer enough just to sell quality products at good prices. The Internet has created a hunger for information. Shoppers want to know what goes into a product. They’re driven by both ethics and a commitment to sustainability. This trend will continue into 2017 and beyond. (Think Millennials).

If you’ve enjoyed these highlights, read the complete Vend report at:

https://www.vendhq.com/university/retail-trends-and-predictions-2017 and watch these predictions become reality.

 

 

 

 

Fasten Your Seatbelts: Generation Z is Ready to Shop

Retail Trend Sees History’s Most Demanding Consumers on the Horizon There’s no rest for the retailer. Just when you thought you’d mastered Millennial marketing, along comes a new wave of consumers you’ve got to figure out. Dubbed Generation Z and 70 million strong, this rising demographic will represent 25 percent of the US population by 2020. It’s time to get ready for what retail trend watchers say will be the most demanding consumers of all time.

Raised Online and Digitally Addicted: Meet Generation Z
Gen Z members are still very young (13 to 18), so it may be difficult to draw too many solid conclusions about their eventual buying habits. But a number of factors are likely to define their future behavior. Consider the following about them:
-First generation born in the 21st century
-Grew up in challenging economic times
-Never knew a world without the Internet
-Citizens of an on-demand culture
-Tethered to technology since their earliest days

That said, a picture emerges of a consumer who expects instant access to everything and who relies on digital resources for discovering what they want and for getting it when they want it. Forty-percent of Gen Z claim they are “addicted” to their digital devices.

Where to Reach The Z’s: Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube
Characterized by their short-attention spans and love of novelty, it’s no surprise that Z’s prefer quick visual communication. Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube are their platforms of choice. In fact, 72 percent say they visit YouTube daily. Streaming movies and music is a way of life for the group – over half do so daily – obviously a result of their on-demand orientation. And gaming is a major focus with a high degree of interest in virtual reality.

Z’s Are Different from Millennials in Surprising Ways
While both these age cohorts are intense social media users, Millennials (age 19-34) are more influenced by it than Z’s. Over half of the older group (58 percent) credit social as a top purchasing driver. Only 53 percent of the younger demo names it as their major influencer.

Millennials, as we know by now, are active reviewers of brands and experiences, sharing their opinions across the social media spectrum. Z’s much less so. Millennials are 40 percent more likely than Z’s to get their viewpoints out. Will the younger group grow into word-of-mouth as they mature? That’s something worth watching.

Gen Z’s were shaped by the uncertain economic environment of the last decade. Despite this experience, they are much less likely to be bargain hunters than the Millennials. The older group is 29 percent more inclined to check and compare prices before and during shopping trips. The Z’s milder interest in pricing may be due to the fact that the majority are not yet living independently. Will they acquire the Millennials’ cost consciousness as they move out on their own? Another retail trend to watch.

Don’t Miss Out on Marketing to Generation Z
Z’s are still in their formative years, but here’s what Deborah Weinswig, managing director of Fung Global Retail & Technology foresees. “Exposure to near-infinite choice and near-endless information makes this generation more demanding than any of its predecessors. As Gen Z matures, it will become more discerning, but its demanding nature is unlikely to be diluted. We think brands and retailers will be the ones that need to change, because Gen Z is unlikely to compromise on its high expectations.” Read more about Gen Z’s consumer demand here.

Yes, today’s tweens and teens will soon be full-fledged consumers with new and unique habits and demands. Savvy retailers should be ready to accommodate them. Sharpen your visual messaging now. Get active on Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube. Stay up to the minute with mobile marketing. Be ready to deliver at warp speed. Develop incentives for the Z’s to follow you on their platforms of choice. A new breed of shopper is heading your way!

For more information on Generation Z:
https://iei.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/GenZConsumers.pdf

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/deep-patel/6-trends-for-generation-z_b_11227446.html

Outlook on Back-to-School Sales Has Retailers Cheering

Total Volume Projected to Reach Near-Record Levels for the 2016 Season

The school bell is ringing in the second biggest retail spending season of the year. Retail trend watchers are predicting more-than-healthy sales with shoppers in an upbeat mood and retailers and retail real estate companies like Levin are keeping a close eye on the action. The National Retail Federation (NRF) projects that total sales will approach a near-record level of $75.8 billion, up from $68 billion last year. The season began early with shoppers hitting stores and online sites in June, and so far the purchasing pace is strong. We’ll see the full story next month, but for now here’s a look at what’s behind the surge.

More Kids in School: A Retail Trend That Will Continue
As the NRF observed, the children of the first wave of the massive Millennial generation are beginning to swell the school age population, contributing to increased BTS spending (a retail trend that’s expected to continue over the next decade as the Millennials enter the job market and form families).

More Confidence in the Economy
Mid-July’s consumer confidence figures held steady with Americans reporting positive attitudes about the economy. That confidence is reflected in Deloitte’s ninth annual back- to-school survey in which 81 percent of respondents said their finances were better or the same as last year. It’s no surprise then that 39 percent of those polled by the Rakuten Marketing Survey said they plan to spend more on BTS purchases than last year. Depending on the source, the projected average spend ranges from $488 to $673 per K-12 student.

Starting Early, Spending More at Bricks and Mortars and Online
Online BTS shopping continues to climb – projected to expand by 9 percent in 2016. But bricks and mortar stores will continue to dominate, except in the electronics category where online is the top choice. Here’s where US shoppers, who’ve been buying for BTS since June, say they will be spending their dollars:

  • Discounters
  • Department Stores
  • Clothing Stores
  • Online (top of the list for electronic purchases)

Online is expected to continue to play a major role in BTS purchase decisions as shoppers (61 percent) reported in the Deloitte survey that they will research products, compare prices and look for deals online prior to heading out to shop. Fifty percent of those said they will rely on their smartphones when making purchasing decisions.

Free Shipping Will Drive Online Purchases, Store Pick-Up Appeals
According to the NRF, online BTS shoppers are heavily influenced by free shipping. Eighty-nine percent of those surveyed said they reject paying for delivery.

Ordering online with store pick-up was favored by 54 percent of the respondents, while 10 percent (predominantly male) wanted same day delivery.

Apparel Heads the BTS Shopping List, Lunch Boxes and Backpacks are the Most Sought-After Accessories
Clothing, electronics, shoes and supplies are the top categories on 2016’s BTS list. (For high school or college students, electronics lead the pack). Office supply stores and drug stores, long the source of pencils and paper, will likely feel new competition from kits marketed by schools or PTAs.

Topping the trends for elementary schoolers are the once-utilitarian lunch box and backpack, reborn in a wide variety of fabrics and styles. It’s Hello Kitty and My Little Pony themes for girls, while boys are opting for camo and superheroes. High-end backpacks for the elementary set feature LED lights, while packs for computer-toting high schoolers and college students offer multiple pockets for electronic gear and accessories.

Not surprisingly, school-bound girls are going for animal prints and glitter, while boys are opting for Under Armor and Nike apparel. But surprisingly, kids are helping fund their BTS buys. The Deloitte study projects that elementary school students will lay out an average of $20 and middle schoolers an average of $33 for BTS purchases. Is this the influence of thrifty Millennial parents? Stay tuned. And stay tuned as well for the final numbers on BTS 2016.

Study Finds That the Vast Majority of Americans Shop Online

But…Bricks-and-Mortar Stores Are Still Dominant by a Wide Margin
Online shopping is no longer a trend. It’s now a way of life in America, with 96 percent of the respondents in a recent study saying they shop online. All demographic groups – from Millennials to Seniors – are turning to their various screens for making a purchase. And, they’re loving the experience, ranking it ahead of smartphone GPS and streaming media as “something they can’t live without.” Big Commerce, an e-commerce platform, and Kelton Global, research consultants, discovered these facts and more in a March 2016 study of 1,000 shoppers. Their findings have been reported by Chain Store Age (see article) and other retail industry media.

The massive report is also well worth a read for leaders in retail real estate. But before you dive into all the findings, check out these ten highlights.

1.Good News for Retail Real Estate
Shoppers love online, but 64 percent of those surveyed still buy in bricks-and-mortars. This includes Millennials – 44 percent said they shop in stores. Women make more shopping trips than men. Men buy more online.

2.More Good News for Retail Real Estate
Survey respondents said their least favorite aspects of online shopping were: inability to touch and feel merchandise, shipping charges, exchanges, and waiting for delivery.

3.Brick-and-Mortar Websites are Online Shopping Hubs
Twenty-five percent of respondents in the Big Commerce study had shopped at the website of a brick-and-mortar store.

 4.Favorite Features of Online Shopping
No surprises here. Shoppers choose online for convenience and speed of sale.

 5.Most Online Dollars Go to E-Commerce Marketplaces
Big Commerce’s respondents spent an average of $488 last year on sites like Amazon and eBay. Their second highest spending level was on the sites of major online/offline brands ($409).

6.What Do Online Shoppers Want on Websites?
Online shoppers want images, video demonstrations, customer reviews, and product comparison – all the things that bring an item to life.

 7.How Do Shoppers Choose an E-Commerce Site?
Price is the main driver (87 percent), followed closely by free shipping and speed (80 percent).

8.Shipping Costs are a Major Stumbling Block to Online Sales
Online shoppers are super-resistant to paying for shipping. Two-thirds of those in the Big Commerce study said they had abandoned their shopping carts when they saw the shipping charges.

9.Social Commerce is on the Rise

Thirty percent of the respondents said they were open to buying through a social media network. More than half the Millennials were ready to shop on social. Facebook and Pinterest were the social platforms of choice.

10.Online Shopping is Everywhere and Round the Clock
In retail stores, in the car, in the office – 24/7 – people are shopping online. Forty-three percent shop in bed and 20 percent shop while in the bathroom. Ten percent admit to shopping under the influence of alcohol (13 percent of them Millennials and 17 percent Gen-Xers). Maybe this is why 42 percent of Big Commerce’s respondents admitted regretting an online purchase, and 21 percent said they had bought something online “by accident.”

It’s an Omnichannel World but Retail Stores Continue to Rule

Consumers Love Online but Still Prefer Shopping at Bricks and Mortar

You know there’s a big retail real estate trend brewing when Amazon, the premier pure play online retailer, announces a plan to open 300-plus book stores. Yes, that’s stores, as in bricks-and-mortar establishments. Market tests of on-campus locations and pop-ups in major cities preceded their February 4 announcement. Amazon’s move is an important indicator of the increasing success of omnichannel and an acknowledgment of the role of the physical store in branding and building sales in concert with online and social media. But the successful bricks-and-mortar establishments of the new omnichannel era we’re doing business in are not your grandpa’s retail store. Read on for a quick glimpse of what’s happening and what’s ahead.

The Traditional Store is Morphing into an Omnichannel Hub

As a leading retail real estate company and one of the top construction management firms in the Northeast, Levin is excited about the coming changes in store design. And, of course, we’re pleased that bricks-and-mortar establishments continue to be favored by America’s shoppers. (Over 90 percent of the transactions in December 2015, in fact, took place in a store, according to the ICSC). http://www.chainstoreage.com/article/icsc-omnichannel-wins-physical-stores-epicenter

As one ingredient in the omnichannel mix, stores now and in the future will have to offer more than just physical access to merchandise. Today’s consumers tend to have pre-shopped online and expect the store to be just one element in a seamless purchasing experience. Store design and construction will have to accommodate “click and collect” purchases made online and picked up in-store, plus returns and exchanges – that means easy in-and-out and space to hold pre-ordered merchandise. The demand for same-day delivery will have implications for parking and loading vehicles.

Information-on-Demand and an “Entertaining” Environment: Retail Real Estate Trends to Watch

Omnichannel shoppers expect web-supported shopping. That means kiosks and touch screens that let them check product availability and place orders, plus store associates with tablets to provide up-to-the-minute information and hassle-free checkouts. As a model store environment, think Apple.
Virtual fitting rooms and same-day delivery are predicted to shrink the selling floor, with more space going to lounges for food and beverage services that rank high, especially with Millennial shoppers. Since omnichannel shoppers prize the VIP treatment, expect to see more sensors, beacons and other electronics that will allow a retailer to deliver coupons and points to mobile phones and direct shoppers to merchandise based on their purchasing profiles. Retailers on the leading edge of omnichannel have already introduced these in-store features. Take a look at Crate & Barrel, NordstromStarbucks, and Top Shop to name a few. Expect more to come. https://erply.com/case-study-how-you-can-copy-nordstroms-secrets-to-massive-retail-success/ and http://insider-trends.com/why-omnichannel-is-the-elusive-holy-grail-of-retail-and-three-retailers-who-have-found-it/

No Longer a Secondary Player, Logistics are Now Key to Omnichannel Retailing

Click and collect and in-store online ordering, both with demand for same-day delivery, have placed new importance on logistics. Warehouses and distribution centers will need to be in closer proximity to stores. Some retail real estate trend watchers predict that large warehouses will become the hub, with smaller centers near stores serving as the spokes in the delivery wheel. The possibility that retailers may supplement their flagships with pop-ups or small specialized boutiques will mean further logistical challenges. http://www.inboundlogistics.com/cms/article/new-retail-strategies-its-a-store-its-a-site-its-a-warehouse/
Warehouses, whatever their size or location, are facing changes driven by the fulfillment of small individual orders with quick turnaround. The impact on IT, employee levels, building design and configuration, and transport are massive, along with the need for acreage in densely populated areas. Retail real estate and construction management are certain to feel the effect of these changes in logistics.

Every Step in Omnichannel Leads to Another Step

The convergence of the virtual and the physical in retailing is just the beginning. As that blend is achieved, new doors are opening. Retailers and the businesses that service them will have to walk through those to succeed in the evolving and complex world of multichannel.