Retailers Invite Store Traffic with Innovative Environments

Retail Real Estate Trend: Shopping Experiences Unmatched Online

The battle for in-store traffic continues with retailers striving to lure shoppers away from their screens and into the aisles. Top retailers are leading the way with a shift in interior design that transforms the store from the transactional to the experiential. Their goal? To offer something online can’t match – at least in the foreseeable future – sensory engagement that brings joy back to shopping. Will these efforts drive consumers, especially the experience-loving Millennials, through the doors of the bricks and mortars? It’s a retail trend worth watching. And if it works, worth imitating. Reinvented retail environments range from the participatory to the digitally enhanced. Here’s what’s happening inside some of America’s most entertaining stores.
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Levin Mid-Year Retail Sentiment Survey Shows Surge in Tech

Tenants Continue to Embrace New Ways to Reach and Service Customers

Results of our annual June poll of the retailers in our 95-property, 13 million-square-foot portfolio are here. Formally known as the Mid-Year Retail Sentiment Survey, this research reveals positive action on the part of our tenants in terms of tech-centered marketing. Almost half of the participants (47.3 percent) have stepped-up their use of these tools, with more than a quarter (26.8 percent) planning to put tech to work this year.

In today’s changing environment, which is so strongly influenced by e-commerce and socio-economic shifts, the message ‘adjust or go home’ is being heard. The good news is that we continue to see our tenants embracing new ways to reach and service their customers, and ultimately draw them into their stores.

Our survey results reflect a current retail trend, with the percentage of respondents who have increased their tech marketing matching other industry polls. The National Retail Federation, for example, in its State of Retailing Online 2017 survey found 48 percent of respondents increasing their technology budgets.
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Fast Casual Eateries are Giving Retail Real Estate a Healthy Boost

Retail Trend: Scramble for Small Restaurant Space Creates a Landlord’s Market
Millennial diners want their quinoa bowls in a hurry and that’s good news for retail real estate companies. Fast casual restaurants – the popular source of healthy, affordable fare – are hungry for 1,500 to 3,000 square foot spaces in shopping venues nationwide. They’re competing with each other and with nail salons, spas and downsizing retailers who are eying the same sized spaces, creating a hot market for retail leasing. Nation’s Restaurant News reports that this competition has “driven lease rates to astounding levels” and created a “landlord’s market.” (Read more: http://www.eater.com/2016/4/28/11523694/restaurant-real-estate) And Jesse Tron, spokesperson for International Council of Shopping Centers calls the current climate “hyper-competitive.”

Tenants in this niche within our leased and managed portfolio include Saladworks, Good Mood Restaurant and Bubbakoo’s Burritos. As tenant representative we work with Dig Inn, the hip, highly popular Boston-based chain, currently on the move into new East Coast markets. So, naturally, we’re staying focused on what’s happening with fast casual restaurants.

Efficient and Appealing, Fast Casual Tops the Industry in Growth and Sales Volume
Led by the rise of Chipotle and Panera in the early 90’s, fast casual fused the speed and convenience of fast food with menus featuring healthy fare. It’s a winning combination, growing the category 550 percent since 1990 and driving the annual growth of fast casual sales to 11.4 percent in 2015, double the rate of any other restaurant segment. Fast casual, which now comprises 7.7 percent of the industry, is expected to lead restaurant sales through 2022, as Millennial diners take healthy dining further with demands for food that is locally raised, according to sustainable and humane practices.(Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/02/02/the-chipotle-effect-why-america-is-obsessed-with-fast-casual-food/?utm_term=.cd1fb581cc35)

Consumer appeal lies at the core of fast casual’s success, but it’s not the sole factor in this segment’s growth. Operationally, the concept is amazingly efficient. Sit-down diners are served in under 8 minutes and 50 percent of orders are take-out. This means a high volume of business can be transacted in a space about one-third the size of the average casual restaurant.

National Brand vs. Local Favorite: Which One Gets the Lease?
Faced with tenants vying for space, managers of retail real estate find themselves
weighing a number of factors when awarding a lease. Fitting out a restaurant space
even one of modest size – is more expensive than a retail store or an office. Ventilation, special kitchen requirements, and local regulations spike construction costs. A successful fast casual establishment, however, can offset that initial investment, not just in rent but in driving shopping center visits which, in turn, attract more demand for leases.

The choice is often between an independent or regional chain and a big national brand. Both bring positive buzz but savvy landlords, especially in the case of shopping centers or malls, tend to choose big names. Brand recognition, a record of success and deep pockets tend to win out. Emerging retail areas in urban neighborhoods, where there may be resistance to chains, may be the exception to this trend.

What’s Ahead: Fast Casual – A Role in Reviving the Mall
As brick-and-mortar stores shutter or scale back, food and entertainment may breathe new life into malls and shopping centers. Ron Ruggles of Nation’s Restaurant News sees a rosy future for retail venues that provide an inviting mix of entertainment, food and shopping to create a community experience that online can’t match. Fast casual, with its Millennial appeal, will have a big role to play in this new environment that replaces transactions with experiences.
(Read more:
http://www.themarketmogul.com/implications-rise-fast-casual-restaurants-real-estate.)

Pop-Ups are Bringing Excitement to Brick and Mortar Retailing

No Longer Just a Retail Trend, but a Way to Build Traffic and Brands
They began popping up in the bleak days of the last recession when shopping was dormant and retail vacancy rates reached 13 percent. Their focus was typically seasonal and their leases were temporary but they helped many a retail property manager survive the downturn. But the pop-ups didn’t fade away when the economy bounced back. In fact, these stop-gap stores have evolved into a $10 billion industry that some retail trend watchers say can help bricks and mortar merchants counter their online competition.

Pop-Up Retail: Custom Made for the Experience Economy
No longer just sellers of Halloween costumes or holiday decorations, pop-ups now provide innovative, sometimes daring, ways for retailers and brands to lure shoppers (especially experience-seeking Millennials) away from their screens. These temporary retail outposts sprout in urban centers, in malls, galleries and public spaces and in unexpected venues like barges, buses, even shipping containers. Known for pushing the envelope of retailing, they rely on the elements of novelty and surprise not associated with traditional stores. Read more: http://popupinsider.com/pop-up-phenomenon/

By now, virtually every brand category has at least dabbled in pop-up retailing. From big names like Nike, Reebok, Levi’s and Samsung to avant designers like Comme des Garcons to newcomers like Etsy artisans, looking to test the market, all have gone the pop-up route. Target has used the pop-up concept repeatedly for cause marketing and to promote its top product lines. eBay stepped out of the virtual world with Showhouse pop-ups decked out in furnishing and accessories available for online bids. Then there’s the Meow Mix Cat Cafe for cats and their humans, which set up temporary residence on Times Square. The creativity shows no sign of stopping.

Traditional department stores have joined the pop-up phenomenon too. Nordstrom turned the concept around with Pop-In @ Nordstrom, where select branches play host to new designers and product purveyors, some chosen because they are usually unavailable in the local market.

What Makes Pop-Up Retail So Hot? Fun and Exclusivity
With their ingenious presentations and unexpected venues, pop-ups offer something absent from the typical shopping experience: fun. When Pop-Up Republic, a specialty marketing and management company, conducted a recent survey, they found that 30 percent of pop-up customers were looking for fun in their shopping experience. Besides fun, pop-ups deliver a sense of exclusivity. Merchandise is often new to the market, making buyers the first to own it. And since the stores operate on a temporary basis, opportunities to acquire merchandise or experience the environment are time-limited –also contributing to a sense of exclusivity. Read more:

https://www.shopify.com/enterprise/91139206-why-pop-up-shops-are-the-future-of-physical-retail

Besides generating sales, pop-ups are attention magnets, capturing both news coverage and social media comments. Marketers are increasingly making them an integral component of their overall advertising initiatives.
More than a Retail Trend: Count on Pop-Ups to Keep Popping Up
Yes, those temporary tenants from a decade ago have morphed into a thriving sector of the retail industry. They are supported by specialty architects and designers like Lion’Esque Group, global consultants like Retail is Detail, and real estate firms like Storefront that match pop-up retailers with available space. And having put fun into shopping, they may be just the boost the old bricks and mortar world needs right now.

Back-to-School Retail Season Looks Like Something to Celebrate

Fastest Rate of Growth in Four Years Was Driven by Electronics and Discounters

Early numbers are in for the 2016 BTS shopping season and retailers have something to cheer about. Though August retail numbers slipped a bit (down 0.3 percent), BTS sales were strong. Retail trend watchers and managers of retail real estate alike can’t help but be cheered by the activity during this second biggest shopping period of the year.

Will BTS Sales Meet the NRF’s 2016 Projection of $75.8 Billion?
Though not all the numbers are in yet, a recent report from Reuters says that 2016 BTS spending grew at its fastest rate in four years. According to statistics from First Data, sales rose 2 percent in July vs. 1 percent in 2015 and 2014 and just .2 percent in 2013. The NRF’s $75.8 billion projection for the BTS 2016 may be realized.

Good Weather and Optimistic Outlook Brought in the Shoppers
Better weather than in recent BTS seasons brought a wave of shoppers into stores. Many of them were searching for bargains – especially parents of young children. These are the thrifty Millennials, who came of age in lean times. “Income rises faster than frugality changes,” one retail analyst suggested.

Electronics Were the Hottest Items on the 2016 Shopping List
As expected, the big-sellers could be found in the electronics category. Electronics and appliance sales have been climbing in 2016 – their sharpest ascent in four years, according to First Data. BTS shoppers went for tablets and USB drives, especially if those items were bundled with special offers. Best Buy’s aggressive offers and coupons delivered strong sales. Items geared for dorm life were among the big winners.

Gap Recovers and Fast Fashion Outposts Score Big
Gap gained traction during the BTS season, leading to thoughts that its troubles may be behind them. Low-priced, fast fashion stores like Old Navy, T.J.Maxx and Marshalls delivered strong numbers, too. Chief Industry Analyst-Retail at NPD Group, Marshal Cohen credited the numbers at these stores to youngsters who will accept shopping at lower-priced retailers because they can get “more stuff.”

Whatever the reason for surging sales, retailers are closing out a banner season – the best in a long time. Now, all eyes are on the winter holiday ahead.